Saturday, February 27, 2016

Summer Scheduling for Recruits


Junior golfers, it’s time to get busy on your summer schedule. My two questions for you are, where will you play and what goals have you set for your summer play?  Once you know the answers, share them with your prospective recruiters, your pro/coach and anyone else on your team.  Here are some ways you can approach your scheduling.  

Your tournament schedule should depend on your age, your ability to score and your financial situation. Start by playing local events until you win. Then move up to state events and then national. Learning to win is an important part of the process and leads to confidence when you take your game to the next level. Taking your game to the next level is a constant process that never quits. You might think that it is over when you get a college scholarship or make the LPGA, but there will be new levels when you hit those goals, too.

In Texas, for example, we watch scores of young players on both the Legends Tour and the TJGT. Both tours offer plenty of weekly tournaments for local kids and also the opportunity to work your way up to their major events that draw players from around the State and Region. They also offer AJGA PBE points, as do many of the events listed below.


AJGA

You can view your summer schedule in many different ways.  One goal you can set is for Polo Points.  If you do this and you play well, you will increase invitations to AJGA Invitationals and give yourself a shot at Polo All America Team, Junior Solheim Cup and Wyndham Cup.  


You gain points with high finishes in any AJGA event or in the following events.  Check out the schedule here:  https://www.ajga.org/schedule/index.asp?year=2016


You can also gain Polo Points by playing in the following events.  These are the summer events.


USGA
Don't pass up the opportunity to compete for your national championship!  Enter your local qualifiers.  You can find the qualifiers for the US Girl's Junior, the US Women's Am or the US Women's Open at usga.org.

WAGR
World Amateur Golf Rankings are another goal you can set for your summer.  Many college coaches check them regularly.  Here are some additional tournaments that are used by the WAGR.
Your State Am or Match Play or Junior Am
and of course, the AJGA events mentioned above will also count.  You have to finish in the top 3 of an event to get started in the rankings.

Parents often ask me where I'll be in the summer, but the truth is, I never know until I get the summer schedules from the players I want to watch.  My assistant David Von Ins and I work to cover the big events in Texas to show support for our junior players.  However, we will jump on a plane in a minute to see a great player who has shown mutual interest.  Parents also ask what we look for in recruiting.  Win at the local level and put that on your resume to get our attention.  We want competitors!  We also want players with strong character, good grades, an attitude that sparkles and the ability to get the ball in the hole.

We hope to see you on the course this summer.  Good luck and good playing!


Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Mid-Season Practice Schedule

Today's blog is a copy of our practice schedule, along with the note included to one of our seniors, Alex Rossi. I love my two seniors and this is my last semester with them. They were our first class at SMU and we built our culture and program on their shoulders.

This practice schedule has some repetition. When we have short turn arounds, it's how I choose to attack the weaknesses that I see and make an impact. Variety is great at keeping the team engaged, but right now, we need focused reps and improvement in very specific things.


Practice Schedule for Alex Rossi
Feb. 24-Mar. 2

Highlights so far:
  • You played Westbrook with nothing above a bogie.  Nice job of minimizing mistakes and playing smart golf!
  • You had 10/5 Ham & Eggs at Westbrook!  That means you made a lot of pars, both by hitting greens and by getting the ball up and down.
  • You averaged under par on par 5’s for the first tournament this year.  Yippee!
  • You had 0 3-putts and a low putting par (+.67)!  
  • You got 2 of 3 scrambles up and down.  (.667)  AWESOME! Your highest % yet!
Things to improve:
  • Work on ball striking.  Long par 3’s need improvement.  You can use the area at DAC and tee balls up and work on hitting to all four sections of the green.  Take note which ones give you trouble and learn how to play to the center for those areas.  
  • Keep working on your swing to get your swagger back.  You had it at Westbrook, but it left a bit as you tired.  Reps with routine and target awareness.  Use aiming tools on the range.
  • If you play tennis, do it with putts that are 5-15 feet.  You can use a tee instead of a hole and the first to hit the tee wins.  I want to see you convert more of your birdie putts and this would be great for your teammates as well!

Things to know about Florida:  
  • Donald Ross course with 5 par 3s.  Small, firm greens with a lot of false fronts and false backs.  
  • It will play much like Westbrook did with short game shots.  The Blue course is a perfect place to play to prepare.  The greens are elevated, so throw some balls down on the Blue where there are elevation changes around the greens, such as the left of #3, the back of #5, anywhere on #6, #11, #13, and the back of #16.  Spend as much time as possible on those type of shots, both at practice and on the course.


Wed., Feb. 24 -  Work on what you need today and/or play.  
Putting:  Star Drill:  Put 5 tees around the hole at 5 feet.  Go around 5 times.  How many of the 25 putts did you make?  Write it in your journal.  

Thurs., Feb. 25 -
Wedges:  Hit 100 wedge shots today.  Choose at least 5 distances and use 2 different clubs/trajectories from each distance.  For example, you might do 100, 80, 60, 40 and 20 yards.  At 100, you might choose to hit 10 balls with your gap wedge and 10 balls with your pitching wedge.  Work on controlling your swing length, tempo, landing point, trajectory and spin.  Ask for help if you aren’t 100% confident!  Work to learn instead of working to be perfect.  Take note of ball flight and ball reaction.  Be aware and make adjustments.  
Chipping/Pitching:  Put 10 balls in a pile 2 steps off the green.  Chip them and try to hole each shot.  Before you pick them up, look at the cluster you’ve made and note your tendencies.  Now do it again and make adjustments.  If you tended to leave it short, get it to the hole or past.  If you tended to leave it right, adjust and play more break!  Now move back 2 steps and do it again.  Keep working until you’re 10 steps off the green. This drill will help you in Florida if you choose a place with elevation.
Putting:  Star Drill:  Put 5 tees around the hole at 5 feet.  Go around 5 times.  How many of the 25 putts did you make?  Write it in your journal.  
Wall Drill:  Put a club 3 feet behind the hole.  Putt 3 balls from 25, 30, 35, and 40 feet.  All three must either go in the hole or stop between the hole and the wall.  
Ball Striking:  Find a place to hit short and mid irons in the short game area.  Hit 10 balls at each pin.  Use your routine.  Be aware of your tendencies.  Make adjustments to aim and distance control.  

Fri., Feb. 26 -  Please play 18 holes today.  Make a tee time with a teammate.  
Putting:  Star Drill:  Put 5 tees around the hole at 5 feet.  Go around 5 times.  How many of the 25 putts did you make?  Write it in your journal.  

Sat., Feb. 27 - OYO
Wedges:  Hit 100 wedge shots today.  Choose at least 5 distances and use 2 different clubs/trajectories from each distance.  For example, you might do 100, 80, 60, 40 and 20 yards.  At 100, you might choose to hit 10 balls with your gap wedge and 10 balls with your pitching wedge.  Work on controlling your swing length, tempo, landing point, trajectory and spin.  Ask for help if you aren’t 100% confident!  Work to learn instead of working to be perfect.  Take note of ball flight and ball reaction.  Be aware and make adjustments.  
Chipping/Pitching:  Put 10 balls in a pile 5 steps off the green.  Chip them and try to hole each shot.  Before you pick them up, look at the cluster you’ve made and note your tendencies.  Now do it again and make adjustments.  If you tended to leave it short, get it to the hole or past.  If you tended to leave it right, adjust and play more break!  Now move back 5 steps and do it again.  Keep working until you’re 25 yards off the green. This drill will help you in Florida if you choose a place with elevation.
Putting:  Star Drill:  Put 5 tees around the hole at 5 feet.  Go around 5 times.  How many of the 25 putts did you make?  Write it in your journal.  
Wall Drill:  Put a club 3 feet behind the hole.  Putt 3 balls from 25, 30, 35, and 40 feet.  All three must either go in the hole or stop between the hole and the wall.  
Ball Striking:  Find a place to hit short and mid irons in the short game area.  Hit 10 balls at each pin.  Use your routine.  Be aware of your tendencies.  Make adjustments to aim and distance control.  

Sun., Feb. 28 - Off

Mon., Feb. 29 - Short Game Practice at Trinity Forest - 3:00 PM

Tues., Mar. 1 Wedges:  Hit 100 wedge shots today.  Choose at least 5 distances and use 2 different clubs/trajectories from each distance.  For example, you might do 100, 80, 60, 40 and 20 yards.  At 100, you might choose to hit 10 balls with your gap wedge and 10 balls with your pitching wedge.  Work on controlling your swing length, tempo, landing point, trajectory and spin.  Ask for help if you aren’t 100% confident!  Work to learn instead of working to be perfect.  Take note of ball flight and ball reaction.  Be aware and make adjustments.  
Chipping/Pitching:  Put 10 balls in a pile 2 steps off the green.  Chip them and try to hole each shot.  Before you pick them up, look at the cluster you’ve made and note your tendencies.  Now do it again and make adjustments.  If you tended to leave it short, get it to the hole or past.  If you tended to leave it right, adjust and play more break!  Now move back 2 steps and do it again.  Keep working until you’re 10 steps off the green. This drill will help you in Florida if you choose a place with elevation.
Putting:  Star Drill:  Put 5 tees around the hole at 5 feet.  Go around 5 times.  How many of the 25 putts did you make?  Write it in your journal.  
Wall Drill:  Put a club 3 feet behind the hole.  Putt 3 balls from 25, 30, 35, and 40 feet.  All three must either go in the hole or stop between the hole and the wall.  
Ball Striking:  Find a place to hit short and mid irons in the short game area.  Hit 10 balls at each pin.  Use your routine.  Be aware of your tendencies.  Make adjustments to aim and distance control.  

Wed., Mar. 2 Play Day - Las Colinas CC

Thurs., Mar. 3 - Travel to Gainesville

Sunday, February 7, 2016

Super Bowl Sunday Golf

Super Bowl Sunday Team Practice
Noon -
Warm up your game and get ready!
12:15
Meet on practice green in short game area.  You will have 5 team challenges.  For every challenge you win, you can add 1 club to 1 hole in the on course competition.
Challenge 1: 2 Minute Warning Drill:  You have 2 minutes to get as many up and downs as you can.  You can have anyone on the team chipping and/or putting.  You will then switch and do the same drill from the other team’s flag.  Your score will be the total up and downs you get.  
Challenge 2:  Field Goals Challenge:  Hit a shot through the cross bars.  The team that gets all three players through in the fewest chances wins the challenge.  
Challenge 3:  Running the Ball - Putt from the tees on the ground.  A make is worth a first down and you move the chains.  You get 4 tries from every tee (1, 2, 3, and 4th down!)  If you miss all four putts, you turn the ball over to the other team.  The turnover causes the other team to start at the first tee and cover the same ground.  The first team to get to the last tee and make it wins the challenge!  You can choose who putts from each tee or take turns.  Your call!  At the 2nd turnover, you start from the tee you last made a putt.  
Challenge 4:  In the Trenches:  Get 2 balls each into ring from the bunker.  The team that does it in the fewest tries wins the challenge.
Challenge 5:  The Hail Mary:  All 3 of you will putt from the tape to the hole at the end of the green.  The closest of the three is your team’s ball and the closest between the two teams wins the challenge.  


On Course Game
You are playing the Blue at 1:23 and 1:32 from the tournament tees. 9 holes today!


This game will be like today’s Super Bowl!  You will need strategy, teamwork, effort, spirit and a little luck.  Good luck and have some fun!

Play with your team.  You get 1 club + your putter per hole.  Once a club is used for a hole, it cannot be used again.  You are playing alternate shot in your 3 some.  You have to take turns teeing off.   For example, the Texans might choose to have Celli tee off on #1 and the team might choose a 5 iron.  All Texans must use their 5 iron for the entire hole.  They may also use their putter.  Celli would hit every 3rd shot and tee off again on #4.  If they win a challenge, they could choose to add a wedge or driver to the hole. The extra club doesn’t count as a club out of play.  A challenge win only allows an extra club on one hole.  We will flip for who tees off first.

Friday, February 5, 2016

It's My Putting, Coach!

This is my 20th year as a head coach and this is the 20th year that I've heard this lament when I talk to players about their up and down statistics.  They tell me that their chipping and pitching is pretty good, but they just don't finish it with a made putt.  My question to them is, what is good?  Is a chip to 4 feet good?  Is a chip to 5 feet good?  Start today's blog by reading this article by Mark Broadie and then hop back to the blog, please.

Closer Encounters by Mark Broadie  At the end of the article, putting coach Phil Kenyon offers you tips about your putting practice.  Pay attention to what he wants you to ask yourself.  What questions should be at the end of each putt you roll?

You're back?  Great, now, tell me what you think about your chipping vs. your putting.  If you don't get a chip up and down, should you continue to blame it on your putting?  If you chip it to 4 feet, you have a lot better chance at an up and down than if you chip it to 5 feet.  You shouldn't expect to make every 5 footer or longer, no matter how great the chip was to get it to 5 feet.

Here are Matt Kucher's putting percentages from 2015.  He was chosen, because he was the best on tour at making putts from 5 feet.

Matt Kucher     Putting inside 5 feet = 98.41% (ranked #1)
                         Putting from 5-10 feet = 56.13% (ranked #107, #1 was 65.52%)
                         Putting from 10-15 feet = 31.21% (ranked #72, #1 was 44.81%)

Matt Kucher was #13 in scrambling at 63.78% in 2015.  I'd guess that he got a lot of shots within 5 feet of the hole when scrambling.  If so, he was almost assured of an up and down.  If it was within 10 feet, he had a bit better than a 50-50 chance of an up and down and outside of 10 feet, he had about a 1 in 3 chance of making an up and down.  I'm giving Kucher the benefit of the doubt that he got almost all scrambling shots within 15 feet.  The point of these stats is, if you want to be certain to have a great short game, don't blame a lack of success on your putting.  Get out there and get every tough shot you might face around the green within 5 feet of the hole.

We recently did a really tough practice and the players weren't having the success they expected.  If you want a great short game, it's a challenge I'd put forth to you often.  You can decide the standards you're basing your success upon.  Here is what we decided upon for this week's goal:

Using 5 balls, choose a chip or pitch shot.  Hit all 5 shots and pick up the two best and the two worst.  Your middle or median shot must be within 3 feet to win the hole.  You must get 3 wins to finish the challenge.

That doesn't sound that tough, does it?  But it is.  What it means is, you're getting 3 of 5 shots within 3 feet of the hole, which from a coach's point of view, assures you of an up and down.We often do it with 3 balls and use the middle ball also.  It's a little easier with three balls, because you are required to get two shots close instead of three.  You can stretch it to within 4 feet or even 5 feet to make it easier, but if you want a tough challenge, keep it to 3 and see how long it takes you to get it done.

As for putting practice, here is an excerpt from Broadie's article that was very helpful for our practice designs.

"We worked on some aspects of his technique, and we structured his practice to create more intensity and variability. In the early season, we spent a lot of time doing performance drills in the key areas of five to 15 feet to integrate the skills of aiming, pace control and green reading. It's helped."  Phil Kenyon - Henrik Stenson's Putting Coach on Henrik's improvement of .7 in strokes gained putting stat.

To put Stenson's improvement into perspective for our team; if each player improved her strokes gained putting by just .5 from last semester, that would equal 2 shots per round for our counting scores and 6 shots per tournament.  According to Golfstat, that would raise our national ranking approximately 15 spots.  GAME CHANGER!  

As Stenson's coach points out, you must integrate your skills of aiming, pace control and green reading inside 15 feet, so we do a lot of challenging drills that ask for those skills to be accomplished.  My players want to become better at reading greens.  The first step to that skill is controlling your pace.  If you read the green well and choose the correct line, you must then hit the ball at the speed to roll on that line and drop in the hole.  So many putts are hit at too soft a speed and dive low or at too firm a speed and roll right through the break.  This is especially true inside of 15 feet.  So, we are actually back to the title of the blog, "It's My Putting, Coach!"  Our goals in practice are to get it inside 5 feet on our first putt or after a chip shot and if we don't, we need to be great at matching our speed with the proper line and roll the ball in the hole.  Pretty much the same as every other college team in the U.S.

So what will separate us?  The questions we ask!  The trickiest part of this whole equation is what a player chooses to pay attention to during her practice.  If you go into each challenge with a learner's mindset, then you will pay attention to your makes and misses and learn from both.  Your questions will lead to answers that lead to positive changes.  If you go into your practice with a judger's mindset, you will question yourself in a completely different way.  This old coach has been watching body language for over 20 years and I can see the difference between a player missing a 5 footer who steps back and looks at it again versus a player who gets disgusted, rolls her eyes and purses her lips.  The first is thinking about speed or break or perhaps stroke.  The second is questioning why she can't make a stupid 5 footer.  The first is practicing to improve.  The second is practicing judgement.  

The questions you ask yourself and the way you ask them will lead to what you take away from your practice.  According to Marilee Adams, "questions are intrinsically relational."  In other words, if you question yourself in your self-talk after missing a 5 footer, are you doing so as a learner or a judger?  Here is an example of this relationship in a coaching situation.  Think about the relationship you have with your coach and how you view her request.  

Your coach goes through a situation with you and asks you to respond to it differently next time you are faced with it.  She might say, "Jodi, next time you hit it into the woods at this golf course, I want you to look closely at simply punching straight out into the fairway and then continue to play the hole."  

With this request, you ask yourself questions.  Is she giving you this directive because she thinks you're dumb?  Does she think you lack the skill to hit a good punch shot?  Is she still mad about the time last semester when you made triple when you went for a tough shot out of the woods?  Is she angry?  Is she disappointed? Is she controlling?  What is she thinking?  These questions wouldn't lead you to a positive mindset.  

What if your questions were more along the line of, Does coach see something that will make me a better player?  Do I need to work on hitting punch shots so I can get more green lights?  Is this a way to help me make better decisions?

Coaches are just as guilty as players at approaching situations from both a judger's mindset or a learner's mindset, so whenever instruction is given, a good coach will preface it with an attitude of care and deliver the instructions calmly and without negative emotions, tone or facial expressions.  Even so, any instruction can be received as a judgement if the receiver chooses to see it in those terms.  

Imagine if every day you showed up to practice with these questions:

What do I want?
What can I learn from this?  
What is useful or valuable?
What does coach want?
What is the best way forward?
What is possible?

Instead of these questions?
What's wrong with me?
Why can't I make a putt?
Why do I have such bad luck?  Why do my putts lip out?
Why is Coach making me do this stupid drill?
How did she finish so fast?  I wonder if she really did it?  I wonder why she's so much better?
Why can't I read a putt? 
Why is this so hard?



"Do you have questions or do your questions have you?" 

Dr. Marilee Adams


Your attitude is formed by your questions, the tone of your inner voice and your ability to learn instead of judge.

When you have a learner's mindset, you choose to take in information and ask yourself questions that allow you to view the information in a positive and helpful light.  Whether you're being coached or listening to your own self-talk, you have to constantly make the choice of a good mindset.  Dr. Adams does a really nice job of explaining how our mindset shapes our ability to see our world and learn from what we do.  

If you want to learn more from Dr. Marilee Adams, you can check her out on youtube.  It's amazing how much excellent content is free for the watching on youtube and this video is indeed excellent!  Dr. Marilee Adams Defining Mindsets

Now, let's go back to the tough short game drill we did above.  Is your goal to finish it? Or, is your goal to finish it and learn from it?  Time is limited.  How can you get .5 shots better in your putting per round this semester?  Start by asking questions that reflect a learner's mindset instead of a judger's mindset.

Monday, February 1, 2016

You Either Got It Or......




Confidence is a familiar theme of this blog, because of it's importance to your success as a player.  How do you get confidence and how do you lose it?  Here are some answers, but the tough part is sticking to the answers when the pressure is high.

How to play confident golf!

  • Commit to the shot at hand.  As Dr. David Cook says, "See it, feel it, trust it."
    • This is one of those things that sounds easy when you're driving to the course and tough to do when the wind is whipping and you're in between clubs and the target looks small and you can't make a decision.  You get the idea.  Your pre-round commitment needs to ring true in your mind at this point and you need to choose a shot, commit to it, see it, feel it and trust it.
      • Did you catch that you need to have a pre-round commitment?  Decide what you want to do and script your success.  For example, "I will see every shot clearly before I step in to hit it." Or, "I will be 100% committed to the shot when I start my backswing."
      • You can take this a step further and track how well you perform your pre-round commitment by keeping a focus score.  Then you can track not just your physical game, but your mental game, too.
    • If you're a visual player, see the shot clearly.  Talk through the trajectory, the shape and the landing point either in your mind or out loud.
    • If you're a physical player, feel yourself making the swing in balance and with nice tempo.
    • If you're an auditory player, hear the great impact you'll have prior to making the swing.
  • Trust your preparation.
    • Know that what you've done is enough for success.  If you've dedicated yourself to your sport, you've put enough time and sweat into your practice to be ready.  
    • You're an athlete who can rise to any occasion.  If you're ill or had a busy week that got in the way of your preparation, you can dig deep into your experience and rely upon your athleticism. 
    • Feeling unprepared for a round or a situation is a defense-mechanism that allows you to perform below your best.  As Steven Yellin says, you have made enough deposits in your bank of experience to perform when it's time to go to the ATM and hit the shot.
If you think confidence is reliant upon a good result, you will always be watching your play for signs that its enough.  Know that it is enough and walk to the first tee with confidence in yourself and your ability to compete.

  • Let go of judgment, comparison and analytical thoughts.
    • A judgment is an opinion you form about a situation or action.  Your brain can be busy figuring out how to score as low as possible, or it can be busy forming opinions and becoming emotional about them.  You don't have the time or energy for both, so it's important to choose to play golf when you're on the golf course.  You will have plenty of time to judge your actions and intentions after the round.
    • Comparisons are silly, because the box on a scorecard has room for a number, but not for the style points it took to get the number.  If you're paired with a big hitter or a player who "makes everything" and you become concerned with their skills, you've become a spectator instead of a competitor.  Be yourself and play your game.  If you think it's enough, it is.
    • Analyzing your play, your problems or your game in general is once again brain power wasted during a round.  The moment you work to figure out the WHYS of what you're doing is the last moment you will be in the moment or focused on scoring.  It is a sure way to leak confidence, because you're giving power to problems, not scoring.
  • Be prepared for the situation, whatever it might be.
    • Mentally role play situations and you'll be able to handle them better than if you're surprised by them.  
    • Have your equipment ready to go.
    • Ask for things to be uncomfortable for you.  You have to want t.v. interviews even if you're shy.  You have to want a gallery and eyes on your game.  You have to want a knee knocker to win.  You have to want the other players gunning for you.  You have to want the biggest stage!
  • Fake it til you make it.
    • Your actions and your emotions are linked to each other.  There's a reason the military works so hard on boot camp posture; shoulders back, chest out, chin up and eyes forward are all markers of a confident person.  If you give in to bad body language for a moment, you allow for your actions and your emotions to marry and it's downhill from there.
    • If you have fear or doubts, you're the same as every player out there.  Everyone experiences these moments.  You need a game plan of what you want to think about instead of allowing yourself to get caught up in negativity out there.
  • Your foundation is your belief in yourself and everything else is reliant upon it.
    • Know that you will face many challenges in a round of golf and meet them with a calm and measured approach.
    • Know that you will make mistakes, but that you can always recover.  
    • Know that you are on a path to being the best golfer you can be, but paths aren't always smooth and every bump will lead to discovery and learning.
  • Find freedom
    • Figure out how to be "young at heart" on the course and play the game instead of working at it.
    • Hit your shot and let it go.  Your ego doesn't have to be attached to your results or your score.  Golf is what you do, not who you are.
    • Script both a pre shot routine that gets you ready for your shot and a post shot routine that allows you to move on to the next shot.  
      • Your routine should have physical, mental and emotional facets.  
        • Physically, you might have a waggle that keeps you loose or a trigger that signals readiness.  Tiger tugs his sleeve and you can tap your club on the ground to get it started.  You can also take a deep breath or focus your feeling on a body part, such as a tight stomach at address.  It's unique.
        • Mentally, you need to focus on what helps you perform.  For most, that is the target, but again, this is up to you and unique.  A swing thought, a tempo thought or a vision of the shot can all be your cue.
        • Emotionally, you need to balance excitement with patience.  Great players are enthusiastic about their own play and look forward to hitting the shot.  Struggling players are often unenthusiastic and feel anxiety before the shot.  Find the love you have for playing the game and be patient with yourself to keep that enthusiasm.  
Jordan Spieth is too busy playing to win to worry about whether or not he's confident.

      • Your post shot routine should be as planned as your pre shot routine.  It will help you stay in the moment, whether you hit a great shot or a poor one.  Give yourself a set routine, such as 10 yards to let it go or when the bag goes in the club, you're done with the shot.  Once again, have a physical, mental and emotional script.
        • Physical things such as a smile, a deep breath, a fist pump or a tug of the cap are all ways to trigger your happiness or unhappiness and finish with the shot.
        • Mentally tell yourself to put this one in the bank and move on or any message that helps you move from the result back to playing the game.
        • Emotionally, celebrate good shots and ground them.  Have a physical move to ground, such as tightening your fist, saying YES to yourself or carrying your club down the fairway.  Anything you choose that signifies your happiness is good.  When you hit a poor shot, don't ground it.  In other words, don't feed it with emotion.  Smile anyway, say NEXT SHOT to yourself or put the club away gently when ready and move on.
Freedom lies in belief in yourself and by remembering to bring enthusiasm and joy with you when you tee it up.  Finding enthusiasm on tough days is the mark of a competitor and finding joy in the challenge is the mark of a player who loves the game and all it offers.  It's up to you!  You have some work to do planning your path to confidence.  

Perfectionists, Read This!

Today, I was scheduled to recruit in North Texas, but my player's plans changed, so I have some bonus time on my hands and I get to do s...